Skokie Summer Nightstand Event

Posted on August 30, 2019. Filed under: Event, Fiction, Nonfiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

During the Summer semester “What’s on Your Nightstand” event at the RHC campus, the following books were discussed.

Remember, if Oakton doesn’t own the book or our copy is checked out, you can order a copy to be sent from one of our consortium libraries for FREE! Most books take less than a week to arrive.

The Weight of Ink
by Rachel Kadish

“Set in London of the 1660s and of the early twenty-first century, The Weight of Ink is the interwoven tale of two women of remarkable intellect: Ester Velasquez, an emigrant from Amsterdam who is permitted to scribe for a blind rabbi, just before the plague hits the city; and Helen Watt, an ailing historian with a love of Jewish history.

When Helen is summoned by a former student to view a cache of newly discovered seventeenth-century Jewish documents, she enlists the help of Aaron Levy, an American graduate student as impatient as he is charming, and embarks on one last project: to determine the identity of the document’s scribe, the elusive ‘Aleph.’

Electrifying and ambitious, The Weight of Ink is about women separated by centuries—and the choices and sacrifices they must make in order to reconcile the life of the heart and mind” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

The Passage
Book 1, The Passage Series
by Justin Cronin

“An epic and gripping tale of catastrophe and survival, The Passage is the story of Amy—abandoned by her mother at the age of six, pursued and then imprisoned by the shadowy figures behind a government experiment of apocalyptic proportions. But Special Agent Brad Wolgast, the lawman sent to track her down, is disarmed by the curiously quiet girl and risks everything to save her. As the experiment goes nightmarishly wrong, Wolgast secures her escape—but he can’t stop society’s collapse. And as Amy walks alone, across miles and decades, into a future dark with violence and despair, she is filled with the mysterious and terrifying knowledge that only she has the power to save the ruined world” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
by Charles Duhigg

“In The Power of Habit, Pulitzer Prize-winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential. At its core, The Power of Habit contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, being more productive, and achieving success is understanding how habits work. As Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

Sweetblood
by Pete Hautman

“Lucy Szabo thinks she knows where the myth of vampires came from. She’s sure that that the first vampires ever were dying from diabetics. And she should know. She’s diabetic herself. When she gets involved with Draco, a self-proclaimed ‘real’ vampire she meets in a Transylvania chat room, her world starts to crash down around her. Soon, her whole life—grades, relationships, and health—are spiraling dangerously out of control. Lucy needs to make some important choices to take back control of her life—but is it already too late?” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

 

Tell Me How This Ends Well
by David S. Levinson

“In 2022, American Jews face an increasingly unsafe and anti-Semitic landscape at home. Against this backdrop, the Jacobson family gathers for Passover in Los Angeles. But their immediate problems are more personal than political, with the three adult children, Mo, Edith, and Jacob, in various states of crisis, the result, each claims, of a lifetime of mistreatment by their father, Julian. The siblings have begun to suspect that Julian is hastening their mother Roz’s demise, and years of resentment boil over as they debate whether to go through with the real reason for their reunion: an ill-considered plot to end their father’s iron rule for good. That is, if they can put their bickering, grudges, festering relationships, and distrust of one another aside long enough to act.

And God help them if their mother finds out . . .

Tell Me How This Ends Well presents a blistering and prescient vision of the near future, turning the exploits of one very funny, very troubled family into a rare and compelling exploration of the state of America, and what it could become” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

The Cat Who Could Read Backwards
Book 1, The Cat Who Series
by Lilian Jackson Braun

“The world of modern art is a mystery to many. But for Jim Qwilleran, it turns into a mystery of another sort when his assignment for The Daily Fluxion leads down the path to murder. A stabbing in an art gallery, vandalized paintings, a fatal fall from a scaffolding—this is not at all what Qwilleran expects when he turns his reporter talents to art. But Qwilleran and his newly found partner, Koko the brilliant Siamese cat, are in their element—sniffing out clues and confounding criminals intent on mayhem and murder. This riveting beginning to the Cat Who series is the perfect cozy mystery for cat lovers to start sleuthing!” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

 

-posted by Huma Abdulaziz

 

 

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