Stunning Images

Posted on April 25, 2013. Filed under: Nonfiction | Tags: , , , , , , |

This week’s blog highlights new books at Oakton that have truly stunning photography to illustrate their chosen topic. The photography in each book truly brings its subject matter to life.

book cover for Fishes of the Open OceanFishes of the Open Ocean: A Natural History & Illustrated Guide
written by Julian Pepperell
illustrated by Guy Harvey

“Between the surface of the sea and depths of two hundred meters lies a remarkable range of fish, generally known as pelagics, or open-ocean dwellers. These creatures are among the largest, fastest, highest-leaping, and most migratory fish on the entire planet. Beautifully adapted to their world, they range from tiny drift fish and plankton-straining whale sharks to more streamlined predators such as tuna, marlin, sailfish, and wahoo.

Fishes of the Open Ocean
, from leading marine biologist and world authority on the subject Julian Pepperell, is the first book to comprehensively describe these fishes and explore the complex and often fragile world in which they live. In what will be the definitive book on the subject for years to come—and, with over three hundred color images, the most lavishly produced as well—Pepperell details the environment and biology of every major species of fish that inhabits the open ocean, an expanse that covers 330 million cubic miles and is the largest aquatic habitat on the Earth. The first section of the book introduces the various evolutionary forms these fish have taken, as well as the ways in which specific species interact and coevolve with others in the food web. A chapter on commercial and sport fisheries explores the human element in this realm and considers such issues as sustainability, catch-and-release initiatives, and the risks of extinction.

The second section of the book provides species accounts of open ocean dwellers organized by group, with overviews and general descriptions that are inclusive of range and distribution, unique physiological and morphological attributes, and the role of each species within its ecosystem. Global distribution maps, original illustrations from renowned artist and scientist Guy Harvey, and truly stunning images from some of the world’s leading underwater photographers round out this copiously illustrated volume” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

book cover for Louis SullivanLouis Sullivan: Creating a New American Architecture
written by Patrick F. Cannon
photography by James Caulfield

“Louis Sullivan’s designs stand today as leading exemplars of Chicago School architecture. Even Frank Lloyd Wright, a former assistant to Sullivan, would later refer to him as his ‘lieber Meister,’ or ‘beloved master.’ Sullivan brought to his practice a conviction that ornamentation should arise naturally from a building’s overall design, restating, in a large or small way, themes expressed in the structure as a whole. Having spent much of his career in a late Victorian world that bristled with busy, fussy ornament for ornament’s sake, Sullivan refuted the fashionable style with the now famous dictum ‘Form follows function.’ This break from tradition is perhaps most evident in Sullivan’s strides to re-imagine the commercial space—from America’s earliest skyscrapers to the small-town banks that populated the architect’s commissions in the second half of his career. 

In Louis Sullivan: Creating a New American Architecture, nearly two hundred photographs with descriptive captions document Sullivan’s genius for modern design. Patrick Cannon introduces each chapter with key biographical information and discusses the influences that shaped Sullivan’s illustrious career. Rare historical photographs chronicle those buildings that, sadly, have since been destroyed, while James Caulfield’s contemporary photography captures Sullivan’s existing Chicago buildings and many other structures in eastern and midwestern cities that are of equal importance in the architect’s oeuvre” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

book cover for Natural FashionNatural Fashion: Tribal Decoration from Africa
by Hans Silvester
translated from the French by David H. Wilson

“The scene of tribal conflicts and guerrilla incursions, Ethiopia’s Omo Valley is also home to fascinating rites and traditions that have survived for thousands of years. The nomadic people who inhabit the valley share a gift for body painting and elaborate adornments borrowed from nature, and Hans Silvester has captured the results in a series of photographs made over the course of numerous trips” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

-posted by Gretchen Schneider

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