One Word Fiction Titles

Posted on May 6, 2013. Filed under: Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Today I thought I’d highlight a selection of newer fiction titles at Oakton’s libraries whose only similarity beyond being fiction is that they all have one word titles.

book cover for BorderlineBorderline
by Allan Stratton

“Life’s not easy for Sami Sabiri, a funny, gutsy fifteen-year-old stuck at a private school where he’s the only Muslim kid. But things are about to get a lot worse.

When Sami catches his father in a lie, he gets suspicious . . . and he’s not the only one. In a flash, the FBI descends on his home and Sami’s family becomes the center of an international terrorist investigation. Now, as his world unravels, Sami must find a way to save his father, his family, and his life” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

book cover for FeedFEED
by Mira Grant

‘The year was 2014. We had cured cancer. We had beat the common cold. But in doing so we created something new, something terrible that no one could stop. The infection spread, virus blocks taking over bodies and minds with one, unstoppable command: FEED.

Now, twenty years after the Rising, Georgia and Shaun Mason are on the trail of the biggest story of their lives—the dark conspiracy behind the infected. The truth will [come] out, even if it kills them.

FEED is the electrifying and critically acclaimed novel of a world a half-step from our own—a novel of geeks, zombies, politics and social media” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

book cover for ExposureExposure
by Mal Peet

“When a black South American soccer star signs on to a team in the country’s racist south, headlines blare. And when he falls for the sensual Desmerelda, a stunning white pop singer and daughter of a wealthy politician, their sudden and controversial marriage propels the pair to center stage, where they burn in the media spotlight.

But celebrity attracts enemies; some very close to home. And its dazzle reaches into the city’s hidden corners, exposing a life of grit and desperation the glitterati could never imagine. When a girl is found murdered, reporter Paul Faustino is caught between worlds as he witnesses the power of the media in making—and breaking—lives. Inspired by Shakespeare’s Othello, this modern tragedy of desire and betrayal, incisively and compassionately told, is a truly enthralling work of crossover fiction” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

Book cover for Habibi

Habibi
by Craig Thompson

“Sprawling across an epic landscape of deserts, harems, and modern industrial clutter, Habibi tells the tale of Dodola and Zam, refugee child slaves bound to each other by chance, by circumstance, and by the love that grows between them. We follow them as their lives unfold together and apart; as they struggle to make a place for themselves in a world (not unlike our own) fueled by fear, lust, and greed; and as they discover the extraordinary depth—and frailty—of their connection.

At once contemporary and timeless, Habibi gives us a love story of astounding resonance: a parable about our relationship to the natural world, the cultural divide between the first and third worlds, the common heritage of Christianity and Islam, and, most potently, the magic of storytelling” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

book cover for Num8ersNum8ers
by Rachel Ward

“Ever since she was child, Jem has kept a secret: Whenever she meets someone new, no matter who, as soon as she looks into their eyes, a number pops into her head. That number is a date: the date they will die. Burdened with such awful awareness, Jem avoids relationships. Until she meets Spider, another outsider, and takes a chance.

The two plan a trip to the city. But while waiting to ride the Eye ferris wheel, Jem is terrified to see that all the other tourists in line flash the same number. Today’s number. Today’s date. Terrorists are going to attack London. Jem’s world is about to explode!” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

book cover for ReamdeReamde
by Neal Stephenson

“The black sheep of an Iowa farming clan, former draft dodger and successful marijuana smuggler Richard Forthrast amassed a small fortune over the years—and then increased it a thousandfold when he created T’Rain. A massive, multibillion-dollar, multiplayer online role-playing game, TRain now has millions of obsessed fans from the U.S. to China.

But a small group of ingenious Asian hackers has just unleashed Reamde—a virus that encrypts all of a players electronic files and holds them for ransom—which has unwittingly triggered a war thats creating chaos not only in the virtual universe but in the real one as well. Its repercussions will be felt all around the globe—setting in motion a devastating series of events involving Russian mobsters, computer geeks, secret agents, and Islamic terrorists—with Forthrast standing at ground zero and his loved ones caught in the crossfire” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

book cover for ShardsShards
by Ismet Prcic

“Ismet Prcic’s brilliant, provocative, and propulsively energetic debut is about a young Bosnian, also named Ismet Prcic, who has fled his war-torn homeland and is now struggling to reconcile his past with his present life in California. He is advised that in order to make peace with the corrosive guilt he harbors over leaving behind his family behind, he must ‘write everything.’

The result is a great rattlebag of memories, confessions, and fictions: sweetly humorous recollections of Ismet’s childhood in Tuzla appear alongside anguished letters to his mother about the challenges of life in this new world. As Ismet’s foothold in the present falls away, his writings are further complicated by stories from the point of view of another young man—real or imagined—named Mustafa, who joined a troop of elite soldiers and stayed in Bosnia to fight.

When Mustafa’s story begins to overshadow Ismet’s new-world identity, the reader is charged with piecing together the fragments of a life that has become eerily unrecognizable, even to the one living it. Shards is a thrilling read—a harrowing war story, a stunningly inventive coming of age, and a heartbreaking saga of a splintered family” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

-posted by Gretchen Schneider

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