The Paris Wife

Posted on October 19, 2013. Filed under: Fiction | Tags: , |

book cover for The Paris WifeThe Paris Wife: A Novel
by Paula McLain

“Chicago, 1920: Hadley Richardson is a quiet twenty-eight-year-old who has all but given up on love and happiness—until she meets Ernest Hemingway. Following a whirlwind courtship and wedding, the pair set sail for Paris, where they become the golden couple in a lively and volatile group—the fabled ‘Lost Generation’—that includes Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.
 
Though deeply in love, the Hemingways are ill prepared for the hard-drinking, fast-living, and free-loving life of Jazz Age Paris. As Ernest struggles to find the voice that will earn him a place in history and pours himself into the novel that will become The Sun Also Rises, Hadley strives to hold on to her sense of self as her roles as wife, friend, and muse become more challenging. Eventually they find themselves facing the ultimate crisis of their marriage—a deception that will lead to the unraveling of everything they’ve fought so hard for” (enriched content provided by Syndetics).

Whether you are a fan of Ernest Hemingway or not, this book is a great read. The author is a truly talented writer whose use of imagery evokes a vivid picture of 1920’s France. Even knowing that the relationship is doomed to end, one is still drawn to watching it slowly unfold until it reaches its inevitable conclusion. This is a fabulous book that captivated me and brought me to tears at the end.

-posted by Gretchen Schneider

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