Educational Activism

Posted on December 3, 2013. Filed under: Nonfiction | Tags: , , |

This week we highlight true stories about people who are fighting for people’s rights to an education. Both of these amazing books are available at Oakton’s Library.

book cover for I Am MalalaI Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban
by Malala Yousafzai

“When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education.

On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive.

Instead, Malala’s miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize.

I Am Malala is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls’ education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons.

I Am Malala will make you believe in the power of one person’s voice to inspire change in the world” (Enriched content by Syndetics).

book cover for Half the SkyHalf the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide
by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn
“Two Pulitzer Prize winners issue a call to arms against our era’s most pervasive human rights violation: the oppression of women in the developing world. They show that a little help can transform the lives of women and girls abroad and that the key to economic progress lies in unleashing women’s potential” (Enriched content provided by Syndetics).

This book, while not focused on education exclusively, does cover the issues of educational repression and how it impacts society. The authors highlight people who have tried a make a difference in this area, and make suggestions on how people can help to improve women’s chances in receiving a decent education in various parts of the world.

-posted by Kevin Purtell & Gretchen Schneider

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