Coming Out Week 2018

Posted on October 8, 2018. Filed under: Nonfiction | Tags: , , , , , , |

The Week of October 8-12, Oakton Community College is celebrating “Coming Out Week.”
There will be panels, classes, and discussions all this week about being a LGBTQ in America today.

We suggest these books and resources to learn more:

9780452297616_p0_v2_s550x406It Gets Better: Coming Out, Overcoming Bullying, and Creating a Life Worth Living
edited by Dan Savage and Terry Miller.

“Growing up isn’t easy. Many young people face daily tormenting and bullying, making them feel like they have nowhere to turn. This is especially true for LGBT kids and teens who often hide their sexuality for fear of bullying. Without other openly gay adults and mentors in their lives, they can’t imagine what their future may hold. In many instances, gay and lesbian adolescents are taunted—even tortured—simply for being themselves.

After a number of tragic suicides by LGBT students who were bullied in school, syndicated columnist and author Dan Savage uploaded a video to YouTube with his partner Terry Miller to inspire hope for LGBT youth facing harassment. Speaking openly about the bullying they suffered as teenagers, and how they both went on to lead rewarding adult lives, their video launched the It Gets Better Project YouTube channel and initiated a worldwide phenomenon. With over 6,000 videos posted and over 20 million views in the first three months alone, the world has embraced the opportunity to provide personal, honest and heartfelt support for LGBT youth everywhere.

It Gets Better is a collection of expanded essays and new material from celebrities, everyday people and teens who have posted videos of encouragement, as well as new contributors who have yet to post videos to the site. While many of these teens couldn’t see a positive future for themselves, we can. We can show LGBT youth the levels of happiness, potential and positivity their lives will reach if they can just get through their teen years. By sharing these stories, It Gets Better reminds teenagers in the LGBT community that they are not alone—and it WILL get better” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

9780674022560_p0_v1_s550x406The New Gay Teenager
Ritch C. Savin-Williams

“Gay, straight, bisexual: how much does sexual orientation matter to a teenager’s mental health or sense of identity? In this down-to-earth book, filled with the voices of young people speaking for themselves, Ritch Savin-Williams argues that the standard image of gay youth presented by mental health researchers—as depressed, isolated, drug-dependent, even suicidal—may have been exaggerated even twenty years ago, and is far from accurate today.

The New Gay Teenager gives us a refreshing and frequently controversial introduction to confident, competent, upbeat teenagers with same-sex desires, who worry more about the chemistry test or their curfew than they do about their sexuality. What does gay mean, when some adolescents who have had sexual encounters with those of their own sex don’t consider themselves gay, when some who consider themselves gay have had sex with the opposite sex, and when many have never had sex at all? What counts as having sex, anyway?

Teenagers (unlike social science researchers) are not especially interested in neatly categorizing their sexual orientation. don’t think that sexuality is the most important thing about them. And adults, he advises, shouldn’t think so either” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

9781936833139_p0_v1_s550x406Youth in Crisis: What Everyone Should Know about Growing Up Gay
edited by Mitchell Gold with Mindy Drucker Gold.

“What is it like to be called an abomination by your religious leaders? To live in fear of losing your family’s love? To be afraid to go to school because of the torment that awaits you? To lie to everyone about whom you love?

In Youth in Crisis, Mitchell Gold and Mindy Drucker asked forty LGBT Americans—from celebrities to youth—to share their very personal answers to these difficult questions. Many discuss their long-buried feelings here for the first time. Several young adults opened up about suicide attempts, depression, fear, and isolation that are still a part of growing up gay.

Gold calls this a silent epidemic and a mental health crisis affecting millions of gay teens. And he emphasizes that this crisis can be solved, with compassion and fair-mindedness-and by getting those whose words and deeds cause harm to finally stop.

The book’s contributors reveal what made them feel alone and unloved—and at times so hopeless suicide seemed the only option. And they suggest ways to help the next generation of teens. These stories are also lessons in perseverance and achievement, showing inner strength and inspiring us all with their triumphs.

Learn the harm religion-based prejudices cause, see the dangers of ‘cures’ like reparative therapy, and get insight into the question of sin and homosexuality that divides many churches and families today. Our book will help you become better able to help gay kids in your family, congregation, or classroom” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

9781439908020_p0_v1_s550x406In a Queer Voice: Journeys of Resilience from Adolescence To Adulthood
by Michael Sadowski ; foreword by Carol Gilligan.

“In this thoughtful study, Sadowski profiles six young people whom he interviewed in their adolescence and then revisited several years later to see how they transitioned from their early isolated… insular silence regarding their gender or sexuality to their ‘queer voices’ of strength, optimism, and defiance… An intellectual complement to the ‘It Gets Better’ project, this works as both a moving human document and a springboard for discussion and research in human sexuality, psychology, sociology, and linguistics” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

9780674971592_p0_v1_s550x406Becoming Who I Am: Young Men on Being Gay
by Ritch C. Savin-Williams

“Proud, happy, grateful—gay youth describe their lives in terms that would have seemed surprising only a generation ago. Yet many adults, including parents, seem skeptical about this sea change in perceptions and attitudes. Even in an age of growing tolerance, coming out as gay is supposed to involve a crisis or struggle. This is the kind of thinking, say the young men at the heart of this book, that needs to change.

Becoming Who I Am is an astute exploration of identity and sexuality as told by today’s generation of gay young men. Through a series of in-depth interviews with teenagers and men in their early 20s, Ritch Savin-Williams reflects on how the life stories recorded here fulfill the promise of an affirmative, thriving gay identity outlined in his earlier book, The New Gay Teenager.

He offers a contemporary perspective on gay lives viewed across key milestones: from dawning awareness of same-sex attraction to first sexual encounters; from the uncertainty and exhilaration of coming out to family and friends to the forming of adult romantic relationships; from insights into what it means to be gay today to musings on what the future may hold. The voices hail from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds, but as gay men they share basic experiences in common, conveyed here with honesty, humor, and joy” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

9780520278233_p0_v1_s550x406School’s Out: Gay and Lesbian Teachers in the Classroom
by Catherine Connell.

“How do gay and lesbian teachers negotiate their professional and sexual identities at work, given that these identities are constructed as mutually exclusive, even as mutually opposed? Using interviews and other ethnographic materials from Texas and California, School’s Out explores how teachers struggle to create a classroom persona that balances who they are and what’s expected of them in a climate of pervasive homophobia. Catherine Connell’s examination of the tension between the rhetoric of gay pride and the professional ethic of discretion insightfully connects and considers complicating factors, from local law and politics to gender privilege. She also describes how radicalized discourses of homophobia thwart challenges to sexual injustices in schools. Written with ethnographic verve, School’s Out is essential reading for specialists and students of queer studies, gender studies, and educational politics” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

9781555835583_p0_v1_s550x406Revolutionary Voices: A Multicultural Queer Youth Anthology
edited by Amy Sonnie

“Invisible. Unheard. Alone. Chilling words but apt to describe the isolation and alienation of queer youth. No longer. ‘Revolutionary Voices’ celebrates the hues and harmonies of the future of the gay and lesbian society, presenting not just a collection of stories but a collection of experiences, ideas, dreams and fantasies that demand not only to be heard but to be recognized as a critical component in a future society where it is hoped all members will be valued” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

9780664262181_p0_v2_s550x406The Bible’s yes to same-sex marriage: an evangelical’s change of heart
by Mark Achtemeier

“In the early 2000’s, Mark Achtemeier embarked on a personal journey with the Bible that led him from being a conservative, evangelical opponent of gay rights to an outspoken activist for gay marriage and a fully inclusive church. In The Bible’s Yes to Same-Sex Marriage, Achtemeier shares what led to his change of heart: the problems with excluding groups of people and the insights into the Bible’s message that led him to recognize the fullness of God’s love and support for LGBT persons. Readers will discover how reading snippets of Scripture out of context has led to false and misleading interpretations of the Bible’s message for gay people. Achtemeier shows how a careful reading of the whole Scripture reveals God’s good news about love, marriage, and sexuality for gay and straight people alike.

This new edition includes a study guide and a new introduction from the author that reflects on the U.S. Supreme Court ruling and changes within the church. Perfect for groups or self-reflection, the study guide directs readers over four sessions to explore both Achtemeier’s book and the Bible” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

9780812224061_p0_v2_s550x406Queer Clout: Chicago and the Rise of Gay Politics
by Timothy Stewart-Winter.

“In postwar America, the path to political power for gays and lesbians led through city hall. By the late 1980s, politicians and elected officials, who had originally sought political advantage from raiding gay bars and carting their patrons off to jail, were pursuing gays and lesbians aggressively as a voting bloc—not least by campaigning in those same bars. Gays had acquired power and influence. They had clout.

Tracing the gay movement’s trajectory since the 1950s from the closet to the corridors of power, Queer Clout is the first book to weave together activism and electoral politics, shifting the story from the coastal gay meccas to the nation’s great inland metropolis. Timothy Stewart-Winter challenges the traditional division between the homophile and gay liberation movements, and stresses gay people’s and African Americans’ shared focus on police harassment. He highlights the crucial role of black civil rights activists and political leaders in offering white gays and lesbians not only a model for protest but also an opening to join an emerging liberal coalition in city hall. The book draws on diverse oral histories and archival records spanning half a century, including those of undercover vice and police red squad investigators, previously unexamined interviews by mid-century social scientists studying gay life, and newly available papers of activists, politicians, and city agencies.

As the first history of gay politics in the post-Stonewall era grounded in archival research, Queer Clout sheds new light on the politics of race, religion, and the AIDS crisis, and it shows how big-city politics paved the way for the gay movement’s unprecedented successes under the nation’s first African American president” (Descriptive content provided by Syndetics).

-posted by Kevin Purtell

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